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 In the paper.

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Mr.NHK



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Join date : 2008-12-20

PostSubject: In the paper.   Thu 22 Jan 2009, 5:01 pm

In todays edition of The Gazette, there was a small article about what could possibly happen after budget cuts. It was very brief outlining about job cuts and program cuts.

However, what any newspaper reports is not 100% accurate. There are always slight nuances that can alter meanings of statements, and there will always be a biases within the media.

I am looking for clarification on the entire article, in comparison to what was said in another forum, quoted below. (In short, I felt that the article was vague and very fatalistic, but this quote is very optimistic.)

Quote :
A: All programs are available to all students. High school students can choose Pre-IB, IB, AP or any other academic program offered. Their choices are generally based upon personal interest, preparation and desire to learn.

The cost of a particular program or series of courses is definitely a factor to be considered. However, it is critical that we maintain programs that meet the needs of all students including those with exceptional talent, those with exceptional challenges and everyone in between. We value all children and will continue to meet their needs to the greatest extent possible.

As you can see from the many posts on this board, there are many "sides" to consider as we work through these difficult budget times.


Last edited by Mr.NHK on Fri 23 Jan 2009, 7:07 am; edited 1 time in total
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Sandra



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PostSubject: programs available for all students?   Thu 22 Jan 2009, 5:15 pm

So can I assume that my freshman can sign up for Honors History, even though the teacher has not sent a recommendation yet to the guidance counselor? Why do the students need recommendations and forms completed for AP courses if they are available for all students? Can we take the chance as parents and push our kids to be in some higher level courses, without a teachers recommendation, even though their grades may be lower? Are all of the sophomore Honors and IB courses really available for my kid?

There was an interesting article in the Washington Post a couple of days ago about how kids are "sorted" in many schools, which can lead to racial inequities within education.


Last edited by Sandra on Thu 22 Jan 2009, 7:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Mr.NHK



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PostSubject: Re: In the paper.   Thu 22 Jan 2009, 6:17 pm

Sandra wrote:
So can I assume that my freshman can sign up for Honors History, even though the teacher has not sent a recommendation yet to Mr. Mortier? Why do the students need recommendations and forms completed for AP courses if they are available for all students? Can we take the chance as parents and push our kids to be in some higher level courses, without a teachers recommendation, even though their grades may be lower? Are all of the sophomore Honors and IB courses really available for my kid?

There was an interesting article in the Washington Post a couple of days ago about how kids are "sorted" in many schools, which can lead to racial inequities within education.

Ms. Sandra, I have noticed that there a lot of your posts are questioning about demographics and such... May I ask why?
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Sandra



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PostSubject: response to Mr. NHK   Thu 22 Jan 2009, 6:59 pm

I ask questions about demographics of different programs because it is fantastic to live in an urban, diverse school district and I am interested in learning more about the district culture and programs. ALthough Schenectady is better than mosturban districts across the state and country, there are still differences in graduation rates for different demographic groups and adequate progress under NCLB. I can't help but wonder why and where these differences in eduational outcomes start and how society as a whole will make sure that eventually, nationwide, no child gets left behind. How can IB programs across the country ensure that all student groups are represented and ready for the challenging program?

I thought this Washington Post article did a good job of discussing some of the impacts of "sorting" students:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/01/18/AR2009011802345.html

"Advanced Placement: Closing Equity Gaps
The Advanced Placement Program’s official Equity Policy Statement calls for “schools to make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population.”

AP Equity Policy Statement:
The College Board and the Advanced Placement Program encourage teachers, AP Coordinators, and school administrators to make equitable access a guiding principle for their AP programs. The College Board is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in rigorous and academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses. The Board encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to AP courses for students from ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the AP Program. Schools should make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population."

Wouldn't it be great if the AP and IB classes in Schenectady were open to all interested students and reflected the valued diversity within the district?
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Mr.NHK



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PostSubject: Re: In the paper.   Fri 23 Jan 2009, 7:06 am

Sandra wrote:
I ask questions about demographics of different programs because it is fantastic to live in an urban, diverse school district and I am interested in learning more about the district culture and programs. ALthough Schenectady is better than most urban districts across the state and country, there are still differences in graduation rates for different demographic groups and adequate progress under NCLB. I can't help but wonder why and where these differences in eduational outcomes start and how society as a whole will make sure that eventually, nationwide, no child gets left behind. How can IB programs across the country ensure that all student groups are represented and ready for the challenging program?

I thought this Washington Post article did a good job of discussing some of the impacts of "sorting" students:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/01/18/AR2009011802345.html

"Advanced Placement: Closing Equity Gaps
The Advanced Placement Program’s official Equity Policy Statement calls for “schools to make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population.”

AP Equity Policy Statement:
The College Board and the Advanced Placement Program encourage teachers, AP Coordinators, and school administrators to make equitable access a guiding principle for their AP programs. The College Board is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in rigorous and academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses. The Board encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to AP courses for students from ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the AP Program. Schools should make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population."

Wouldn't it be great if the AP and IB classes in Schenectady were open to all interested students and reflected the valued diversity within the district?

You raise many valid points and questions that I too would be interested in knowing the answers of. It would be great for all programs to help reflect the districts wide diversity.

But since when have the AP and IB programs not been available to those interested, and those who are willing to do the work? I remember us all being told about the IB Program back in Middle School, and what we would have to do to to become IB Students.

Also, is it really society's job as a whole to make sure that No Child Is Left Behind, or the parent's job? (Btw, in my opinion, when NCLB was created, the funding was left behind by the government.)
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mybigfamilyof9



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PostSubject: Re: In the paper.   Fri 23 Jan 2009, 10:17 am

Sandra you ask very intelligent questions I haven't thought of. As far as the No child left behind act.I do not have the education as a trained teacher to teach my child what theyneed to get through high school. How can it be my responsibility to teach him. If i could then what would be the purpose of sending them to school? I have a child in special ed with all sorts of modifications and he is failing 3 or more classses and failed 2 last semester because his IEP wasn't met. What do I do about that?I help him with homework but I'm basically doing it because the teacher sends home the same work other children get in his class and nothing is modified as stated in his IEP. I don't understand it, if he couldn't do the work before on his own and you send a packet of the same work saying I'm giving him extra time, how is that helping him?I feel that when I send my kids to school is for the teachers to teach them. My job to me is to make sure they are respectful,they pay attention, participate and do their homework.I had a teacher tell my son, she doesn't have time to help him because its too many kids in the class to help (13) I think.Also sometimes different teaching methods are needed.
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Sandra



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PostSubject: Special Education   Fri 23 Jan 2009, 11:35 am

Response to mybigfamilyof9

I am not familiar yet with the special education programming in Schenectady but I have an adult child with a learning disability. He was pulled out in a Wisconsin District while in school for English/Reading/Spelling and instead of just modifying the curriculum, the school district provided remediation services to help him and to decrease the gap between his reading/spelling levels and the levels typical for his age. We even split the cost of intense reading tutoring for one summer with the district since he did not qualify for extended school year services with the district in Wisconsin and he gained a year over the summer instead of regressing.

I would encourage you to read through your child's IEP and communicate closely with the teacher involved. Special Education can use so many different approaches and there is no one size fits all, but instead can find a method that works best for your child.

Good luck.
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PostSubject: Re: In the paper.   Today at 8:42 am

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